HISTORY OF CHOCOLATE

The history of chocolate and its treatment can be traced back to the BC era. We can find the first evidence of eating cocoa beans at the Olmecs in 1500 BC. In the first millennium AD, chocolate would be the delicacy of social elites of the Mayans and the Aztecs who enjoyed it in its liquid form, without sugar, but well spiced with chili, for example. And the cocoa beans would even serve as a means of exchange.

CHOCOLATE WORTH GOLD

Curiously enough, there is also a record of the first encounter of the Europeans with cocoa. On his fourth travel to America, Christopher Columbus captured a Maya canoe close to the island of Guanaja. It was loaded with cotton, weapons, grain, and metal objects. According to the text that was preserved, there were also some almonds in the canoe the indigenous people would use as a means of exchange. Yet by that time Christopher Columbus showed no more interest in them, and when he died ten years later, he probably hadn´t tasted cocoa at all.

THE FIRST CHOCOLATE BAR IS BORN

It was in Spain where cocoa beans entered European ground for the first time. And it was in the very same country in the Monasterio de Piedra in Aragon where the monks would prepare the first European cup of chocolate in 1534. For more than one century, chocolate was known only on the Iberian Peninsula. It was only in the second half of the 17th century when it arrived to other European countries through the UK. And it wasn´t until 1847 that the first bar of solid chocolate saw the light of day. This can be put down to the famous chocolate company J. S. Fry & Sons which had developed a special procedure of chocolate manufacture, and so the bar chocolate quickly spread all over the world.

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